43rd Unit Crests
The following illustrations and desriptions list the principal units of the 43rd Division. 

Most color representations and crest descriptions were obtained from the Dept. of The Army, Institute of Heraldry, and the book "Order of Battle" by Shelby L. Stanton.

If anyone should have better copies than some of these, or insignias of units not listed; please contact me so I can amend the site as needed.

43rd Infantry Division Insignia
Originally approved for the 43rd Division on October 4, 1929.  It is a rectangle with rounded corners, divided per pairle, red, white and blue, bearing the gold crests of the states Connecticut ( grape vines ), Rhode Island ( anchor ), Vermont ( bucks head profile ), and Maine ( pine tree ).

On October 1, 1997, the distinctive unit insignia was redesignated for the 143rd Support Group ( AREA ), Hartford, Connecticut.
43rd Infantry Division Shoulder Sleeve Insignia
Originally approved March 15, 1923.  It is a scarlet quatrefoil, edged with olive green, with a centered black grape leaf.  The patch is appoximately 2 3/8" square.  The four lobes represent the four New England states of Connecticut, Maine, Rhode Island and Vermont.

The grape leaf is representative of the fact that New England was once called "Vineland" when it was explored by Leif Ericsson because of all the wild grapvines.  The red background indicates that New England was once a British possession.

As a result of redesignation of the 43rd Division to the 143rd Support Group, this shoulder sleeve insignia was cancelled on September 30, 1997.

102d Infantry Regiment
Connecticut National Guard
Approved on March 26, 1927.  The shield background is white for Infantry, the blue saltire repreasents Civil War service ( North ), the gold lion from the arms of Great Britain represents Revolutionary War service, the prickly pear cactus is for duty on the Mexican Border, and the Fleur-de-lis represents World War I service in France.

The Motto on the banner reads "Stand Forth".  The 102d was originally part of the 43d when the Division was inducted into federal service in 1941.  The 43d was a "square" Division, comprising of four Infantry Units.  On February 19, 1942, the 102d was relieved from assignment to the 43d making it a "triangular" Division.
This page is still being updated - More unit crests to come!

Campaigns:  K Company, 102d Infantry Regiment, served on Leyte Island, Philippines.

103d Infantry Regiment
Maine National Guard
Originally approved on July 14, 1924 for the 103d Infantry.  The shield background is white for Infantry, the blue saltire represents Civil War service ( North ), and the Fleurs-de-lis represents World War I service in France.Motto on banner reads "To The Last Man".

The The original 103d Infantry Regiment of 1941 had many companies where commands would be given in French.
Campaigns:  Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, New Guinea and Luzon, Philippines.
The 103d crest was redesignated in 1959 for the 103d Armored Cavalry, in 1961 for the 20th Armor, and in 1968 to the 133d Engineer Battalion.

Connecticut National Guard
169th Infantry Regiment
Approved March 2, 1927.  The shield is white for Infantry, the blue saltire symbolizes Civil War service ( North ), the Fleur-de-lis for World War I service in France, the prickly pear cactus for Mexican Border duty.  The red chief charged with the gold lion represents Revolutionary War service against the "Red Coats", the lion being from the British Arms.

Motto on the banner: "ARMIS STANT LEGES"  ( Laws are Maintained by Force of Arms ).
Campaigns:  Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, New Guinea and Luzon, Philippines.  Arrived in Japan for Occupation Duty on September 13, 1945.

172d Infantry Regiment
Vermont National Guard
Approved August 14, 1923.  The shield represents Mt. Mansfield and the Camel's Hump as seen from the west across Lake Champlain.  The silver cross was the badge of the old "Vermont Brigade", one of the most famous Brigades of the Civil War.  Motto reads:  "Put the Vermonters Ahead", and is from General Sedwick's order to the 6th Corps on July 1, 1863 on its march to Gettysburg.

Top of the crest depicts a buck's head within a garland of pine branches.  On October 26, 1942, at the island of Esperitu Santo in the New Hebrides island group, the transport ship U.S. President Coolidge struck two mines and sank.  As a result of the sinking, the 172d Infantry did not make it to Guadalcanal until the 23rd of March, almost five weeks after the rest of the 43d Division.
Campaigns:   Northern Solomons, New Guinea and Luzon, Philippines.  Arrived in Japan for Occupation Duty on September 13, 1945.

103d Field Artillery Battalion
Rhode Island National Guard
Approved on March 28, 1931.  The shield is red for artillery.  The field piece and cannon balls on a mound were taken from the old Providence Marine Corps Artillery coat buttons.  They also designate Civil War service ( North ) at Bunker Hill.  The gold chevron represents the Cavalry origin of the Second Battalion, and the six Fleurs-de-lis represent World War I service in France.

Motto reads:  "Play The Game".
Campaigns:  Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, New Guinea and Luzon, Philippines. 

152d Field Artillery Battalion
Maine National Guard
Approved on August 28, 1941.  The shield is red for artillery.  A projectile bendwise at 45 degrees, surrounded by lightning bolts.  The motto reads:  "On The Way" and is under review at this time.  The 152d Unit Patch from the U.S. Army, Institute of Heraldry has the motto as "Continuing".  The Heraldry states that the On The Way motto was used for the 1st Battalion only of the 152d which was redesignated as the 203d F.A. which served in Europe during W.W.II.  In May of 1946, the 203d FA was redesignated back into the 152d.

 
Campaigns:  Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, New Guinea and Luzon, Philippines. 

169th Field Artillery Battalion
Rhode Island National Guard

Approved on August 3, 1942.  The shield is red for artillery.  The fiels piece and cannon balls on a mound were taken from the old Providence Marine Corps Artillery coat buttons.  They also designate Civil War service ( North ) at Bunker Hill.  The gold chevron represents the Cavalry origin of the Second Battalion, and the six Fleurs-de-lis represent WW I service in France.

The motto reads: "Fight To Win". 

Campaigns:  Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, New Guinea and Luzon, Philippines. 

192d Field Artillery Battalion
Connecticut National Guard

Originally approved on March 25, 1927 for the 192d Field Artillery Regiment, it was redesignated for the 192d Field Artillery Battalion in July of 1942.  The shield is white, the old facings of the Infantry.  The cross is for Revolutionary War service, and the blue saltire is for Civil War ( North ) service.  The Fleur-de-lis repredents WW I service in France, and it sits on a red chief ( background ), the present color for Artillery.

The motto reads: "Skill And Force".

Campaigns:  Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, New Guinea and Luzon, Philippines. 

118th Engineer  Battalion
Rhode Island National Guard

Originally approved on May 6, 1930.  The shield is red with white, representing the Engineer Corps colors.  The distaff - ( a rotating vertical staff that holds wool for spinning by hand ), symbolizes that the city of Pawtucket, Rhode Island is the birthplace of the textiles industry. 

Pawtucket was the city where the first unit ( Company A ) was organized.

Motto reads: "Facta Probant" - Deeds Prove Us.  The crest was redesignated in January 1952 for the 118th Engineer Combat Battalion, and in 1967 it was allotted to the 118th Military Police Battalion.

Campaigns:  Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, New Guinea and Luzon, Philippines. 

118th Medical  Battalion
CT, VT & RI National Guard

Approved on June 15, 1928.  The shield is white with a red cross.  Between the top of the cross is a Fleur-de-lis for WW I service in France, and a prickly pear cactus for Mexican Border duty.

Although the 118th Medical Battalion was a unit unto itself, its troops were attached to and stayed with the other Battalions.

Campaigns:  Guadalcanal, Northern Solomons, New Guinea and Luzon, Philippines.